Archive for April, 2015

#52Ancestors: Week 17 – One marriage, two citations for Lucina Hedges and Lewis Howes

This is week 17 of the 2015 #52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge where a group of u52ancestors-2015 Images blog about a different ancestor for each week of the year.  To learn more about the 52 Ancestor Challenge visit Amy Johnson’s site at Amy’s website.

I am using this post to practice writing proper source citations.  My homework assignment for my ProGen25 study group was writing citations.  Instead of just pasting a copy of whatever I can grab to source, from now on, I will be using proper citations.

My second great grandparents, Lewis Howes and Lusina Hedges, were married in Warrick Co., Indiana.  They reared their family in Boonville, IN.  Their marriage record is indexed twice on FamilySearch due to variant spellings of their names.  I do not know if there is an image of their marriage record.

I have listed Lewis last name as Howes, the spelling that my grandfather used. Past spellings include;  House and Howse.  Lusina was also listed as Sina, or Lucina.

Two Indexes

Both index’s below list the same FHL film number, 549452.  In searching “Hedges” in FamilySearch.org, the short index came up quickly.  Entering “Howse” the search came up with the longer version from a different set of marriage records.  This index implies there is an image, however, it is not available online.

The image below is a short form from the 1780-1992, Indiana Marriages index.

Short form marriage index of Lewis Howse and Lusina

Short form marriage index of Lewis Howse and Lusina

This index listing is from the 1811-1959 Indiana Marriages, has more information. Lusina first and last name are spelled differently, Lusena Hodges.  The compiler of this index may have read the names differently or the handwriting in the original image may have not been clear.

Index of marriage record for Lewis Howse and Lusina Hedges

Index of marriage record for Lewis Howse and Lusina Hedges

Source Citations
Indiana, Marriages, 1780-1992, index, FamilySearch.org (http://familysearch.org; accessed 26 April 2015) entry for Lewis Howse and Lusina Hedges, 23 April 1852.
Indiana, Marriages, 1811-1959, index, FamilySearch.org (http://familysearch.org; accessed 26 April 2015), Lewis Howse and Lusena Hodges, 23 April 1852, citing Warrick, Indiana, County Clerk Offices.

 

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#52Ancestors: Week 16 – Pittman Family Longevity – Medical History Clues

This is week 16 of the 2015 #52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge where a group of u52ancestors-2015 Images blog about a different ancestor for each week of the year.  To learn more about the 52 Ancestor Challenge visit Amy Johnson’s site at Amy’s website.

This week’s theme inspiration from the 52 Ancestor Challenge is “Live Long” applies to ancestors who lived to 100.   The only centenarian in the tree that I know of, is the mother-in-law of a great half uncle.  Mildred Doty McGrath (1899-2006) lived to be 106 years old and sharp as tack.  I do have several ancestors who did “live long“.  In the 2014 Edition of the challenge, I wrote about my 2nd great grandfather, John Thomas Pittman, who lived to age 93.

Currently, there are two living family members who are in their early 90’s.  One is a grandson of John Thomas Pittman.  The other is on my Polish side.  Each of these individuals knew my great grandparents. I have spoken to both to glean some stories from the past.

Pittman Longevity

John’s daughter, my great grandmother Mable Pittman, lived to the age of 83.  My grandmother Olive, lived to be 86. Where there any other Pittman’s who lived into their late 80’s or 90’s?

Yes, two of John’s younger brothers. Brother, William S. Pittman (1878-1963) was octogenarian, passing away at age 85.  Also a nonagenarian, was his brother James Alexander Pittman, lived to be 90.  James was the only brother who never married.

John was married twice.  Of the four children from the second marriage, his daughter Tena, lived to 84.  Mable’s sister, Kit (Mary Katherine Pittman Jackson) lived to be 77.  Two of her children lived into their early 80’s.

Pittman Family Longevity and Medical History

Am I going to get Alzheimer’s, some other health condition? Maybe, maybe not!  Depends on all of the genetic DNA mix that created me, along with environmental agents and health lifestyles.  I am acutely aware of the medical conditions in my maternal line.  There is a pattern that occurs in John, Mable, Olive and her siblings, and my mother’s siblings. My health report from the DNA test I took at 23andMe, states there is a probability that I may get this or that.  Nothing is conclusive.

I am anticipating that I will make to 85 years of age.  That is the age I am using to make sure there is enough money the retirement nest egg.  Spend less, save more is my motto.  I buy life experiences that some of my family members don’t understand as they pile useless junk in the garage.  Saving a little more now to use later is actually prudent for me. Plus, if/when the time comes for me to move into a nursing home, I hoped the savings will cover a great facility.

Now I just need to pick the right niece or nephew who will put me in a great place and not use the money to buy things.

After all, only time will tell.

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#52Ancestors: Week 15 – Grzesiak surname – “How do you spell that?”

This is week 15 of the 2015 #52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge where a group of u52ancestors-2015 Images blog about a different ancestor for each week of the year.  To learn more about the 52 Ancestor Challenge visit Amy Johnson’s site at Amy’s website.

 

This week theme inspiration is “How do you spell your last name”? I have to make corrections all the time to my last name, Budny. I have written about the “Borucki” last name too. Sure, you can get the spelling down. But, can we latter descendants actually pronounce the name correctly?

Intertwined on the family tree is the lineage and descendants of my mother’s first husband, Robert Gaber. Robert’s grandmother is Rozalia Grzesiak. “Grzesiak” is the spelling I am currently using in my Family Tree Maker database. That may change depending on future research and consensus. Rose, as she is most known by in various records, was of Polish ancestry. Grzesiak or Griacjka may be of Lithuanian ethnicity. Rose’s birth location has been recorded as Lithuania, Poland Austria, or Galicia.

I have listed the various spelling variations gleaned from Ancestry or FamilySearch. It appears that Rose could not write her name. An “X” mark is used as her signature on both Helen and Blanche’s birth records.

How do you spell “Grzesiak”?

Rozalia Gressiak – 1891 – Rose’s marriage record to Casper Gaber
Rose Gresshack – 1906 – Helen Gaber’s original and corrected birth record
Rosalia Greszek – 1915 Katie Gaber’s marriage license to Alexander Ravinski. This marriage doesn’t appear to have been solemnized.
Rose Gresiak 1925 – son Joseph’s marriage record to Anna Syrze
Rose Greshock – 1926 – daughter Caroline Gober (Gaber) marriage record to Frank J Neja (Naja)
Creesiak – 1929 – Blanche Gaber’s marriage record to Ferdinand Kozakiewicz in Detroit, MI
Grzesiak – 1941 Delayed birth record for Blanche Gaber, born in 1908. Rose was the informant.
Rozalia Griacjka Gaber – Find a Grave Memorial# 133016852

Sources:

“Pennsylvania, County Marriages, 1885-1950,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KMC5-VNR : accessed 12 April 2015), Kaspar Gaber and Rozalia Gressiak, 01 Jun 1891; citing Marriage, Pennsylvania, county courthouses, Pennsylvania; FHL microfilm 2,131,180.

Ancestry.com. Pennsylvania, Birth Records, 1906-1908 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015. – Original data: Pennsylvania (State). Birth certificates, 1906–1908. Series 11.89 (50 cartons). Records of the Pennsylvania Department of Health, Record Group 11. Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

“Pennsylvania, County Marriages, 1885-1950,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KMCY-VTX : accessed 12 April 2015), Rosalia Greszek in entry for Alexander Ravinski and Katie Skrowron, 06 Jul 1915; citing Marriage, Pennsylvania, county courthouses, Pennsylvania; FHL microfilm 2,131,385.

“Pennsylvania, County Marriages, 1885-1950,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KMZS-9GJ : accessed 12 April 2015), Rose Gresiak in entry for Joseph Gober and Anna Syrze, 11 Nov 1925; citing Marriage, Pennsylvania, county courthouses, Pennsylvania; FHL microfilm 2,131,506.

“Pennsylvania, County Marriages, 1885-1950,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KMZS-S7Z : accessed 12 April 2015), Rose Greshock in entry for Frank J Neja and Caroline C Gober, 14 Jun 1926; citing Marriage, Pennsylvania, county courthouses, Pennsylvania; FHL microfilm 2,131,506.

Blanche Gaber’s marriage record. Michigan, Marriage Records, 1867–1952. Michigan Department of Community Health, Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics. Ancestry.com. Michigan, Marriage Records, 1867-1952 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.

Findagrave.com, Find A Grave Memorial# 133016852, created by: roger56chevy, Record added: Jul 19, 2014. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=133016852&ref=acom

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#52Ancestors: Week 14 – Lloyd Lester Pinney – World War II Bonus Case Files

This is week 14 of the 2015 #52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge where a group of u52ancestors-2015 Images blog about a different ancestor for each week of the year.  To learn more about the 52 Ancestor Challenge visit Amy Johnson’s site at Amy’s website.

“He is a much older man” they whispered. When family members talked about Lloyd it was in hushed tones. When your husband is older than your parents, yes, people will talked, quietly. That lets you know there must be some juicy story to tell. As a teenager, I wasn’t that interested in the gossip.

Lloyd Pinney was indeed much older than his wife Doris Budny. At 28 years her senior, Lloyd brought some stability to Doris’s life. My aunt Doris went down a rocky path in life. The union to Lloyd in her late 30’s helped a bit. The couple would move to Mayflower, Arkansas. After that, there wasn’t much talk of Doris and Lloyd.

Lloyd outlived Doris by four years. In 1984, Doris passed away at the age of 44. Lloyd moved back up to Michigan after her death. He was 75 years old when he died in 1988.

So who was this “much older man”?

Lloyd Lester Pinney, is the son of Allison G. Pinney and Laura M. Stover. He and his sister Ella Louis Pinney were born in Webb, Iowa. Lloyd remained on the farm until he was 30. Then far away in Hawaii, the unthinkable happen. The farm boy from Iowa joined the US Navy on January 14, 1942; five weeks after the Pearl Harbor attack. He was in the service for 20 months.

I found out about his service record from the World War II Bonus Case Files. When I first saw the title of the database, I envision juicy secret war records. No such luck. Move along folks, no gossip to be found here. Lloyd was in the files because he received cash money from the Iowa Legislature for his service to his country.

Iowa, World War II Bonus Case Files, 1947-1954

The following description is from Ancestry.com

In May 1947, the Iowa Legislature approved bonus payments of up to $500 for men and women who served on active duty in the U.S. armed forces between 16 September 1940 and 2 September 1945. To qualify, applicants had to be legal residents of Iowa for at least the six months prior to their service.

Along with name, birth date and place, place of residence for six months prior to enlistment or induction, and address where a check could be sent, forms may provide a wide variety of details related to the applicant’s service. The forms in this database were filled out by veterans.

WWII Bonus Case File Application

WWII Bonus Case File Application

Lloyd Pinney WWII Bonus File Page 2_1950

Page 2 of Lloyd Pinney’s application

Lloyd’s application affirms that he was living in Webb, Iowa before he joined the service. He may have traveled to Buffalo, NY, for training, as his service started there. Lloyd’s bonus payment was $230. In 1950, that amount would cover about three months’ rent.

 

Farm Boy Moves to the Big City

The form doesn’t provide where Lloyd mustered out of service. Lloyd does make his way to Detroit, MI, most likely for work. He married Amy E. Reagan on January 3, 1945. She divorced him a scant two years later. What life Lloyd led between 1947 to about 1977 remains a mystery. I have not be able to find his name in any city directories. I don’t know when or where he met my Aunt Doris.

Because of the age difference, Lloyd was already retired when my aunt turned 40. There were no children from the marriage. My aunt and her husband had their life out in rural Arkansas. I was busy with my life in the city. And then, they weren’t there anymore for someone to talk about them.

The winds of time whisper their names to tell me not to forget them. Add their stories to the family tree the whisperer says. By gossiping, they shall be known.

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